Top StoriesPedal Past Dark with Tour La Nuit

Pedal Past Dark with Tour La Nuit

Pedal Past Dark with Tour La Nuit

All photos courtesy of Ottawa Vélo Fest.

Every cyclist knows the dream of having an entire main road to themselves. There really isn’t anything like flying down Colonel By Drive on Sunday Bike Days or turning the art gallery corner to find the Alexandra Bridge completely empty.

This Friday, Capital Vélo Fest plans on capturing that feeling for hundreds of local cyclists with their fifth annual Tour La Nuit.

“I went to the Tour La Nuit in Montreal about six or seven years ago and it was just a delightful event. And I thought that Ottawa could have a similar festival,” says Vélo Fest founder and executive director Dick Louch.

In the Tour La Nuit, Louch’s organization will be blocking off 20 kilometres of road between City Hall and the experimental farms to allow the cyclists to enjoy ‘a night under the stars without any cars.’ The riders are encouraged to show off their most elaborate array of bike lights and enjoy some great food, drinks and music.

Capital Velo Fest
The Human Powered Vehicle Operators of Ottawa's bicycle freight-train.

One group called the Human Powered Vehicle Operators of Ottawa really goes all out with their decorations. A few years ago they brought a tandem-recumbent bike pulling a trailer and lit the whole thing up to look like a freight train.

“One year they came towing an organ behind them, and we had someone playing,” Louch recalls. “Last year they were towing a hot-tub that was filled with stuffed animals and kids.”

Other cyclists carry speakers in their baskets or in carts behind them, giving the ride a roving soundtrack.

Louch’s first goal with the night is for people to have fun, and the second goal is for people to take that fun to the streets and enjoy city cycling, especially night cycling, more often.

“Many people have said to me that they don’t feel comfortable riding at night,” Louch says. These riders are often concerned about not being seen by cars or not seeing other potential dangers.

“By coming out in this environment where the roads are closed…they can hopefully feel safe and see that it’s not so bad,” says Louch.

Capital Velo Fest 3Adult admission for the ride is $20, and most of the money goes to paying for the non-profit Vélo Fest’s operational costs. Running the Tour La Nuit requires money for the police to close roads, insurance and the venue rental at City Hall among other expenses. The event’s sponsors include cycling groups and eco-companies like Citizens for Safe Cycling, RightBike and EnviroCentre. The $20 entry fee buys you more than just admission into the ride. Everyone who signs up for Tour La Nuit will receive a free light that fits over their tire valve and lights up the wheel with a band of colour.

“Most bikes have a light on the front and back, but there’s not a lot of visibility from the side,” says Louch. “These lights really make you stand out because they’re a bright glowing neon colour…it not only makes you very visible, but you look totally awesome.”

To find out more about Friday's event, check out the Capital Vélo Fest website here.

Comments (0)

*Please take note that upon submitting your comment the team at OLM will need to verify it before it shows up below.